Divorced with Kids: Tips for Back to School

Resolve to make each school year better than the last.

Resolve to make each school year better than the last.

It is that time of year again: teachers are decorating their classrooms, parents are shopping for school supplies, and students are enjoying the last few days of summer vacation.  The new school year is about to start.  What are you going to do to make this a great year?

Back-to-school season is even more stressful when your child shares two homes.  Your child’s education is tough enough already–meeting teachers, tracking homework, signing and filling out permission forms, keeping track of extracurricular activities–without having to deal with the extra chores involved in split custody.  Here are a few tips to get your child’s school year off to a good start–

1.  Keep a positive attitude. Your child may be reluctant for the summer to end and for the back-and-forth of regular visitation to resume.  When you keep a positive attitude, it makes it easier for your child to make the adjustment.  Your child will feed off of your emotions.  Don’t let them sense that you are uneasy about your ex-spouse’s visits.  Instead, help your child to look forward to spending time with their other parent.

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Keep a Visitation Journal or Calendar!

22888gfb1yh0sed1Honore: We met at nine
Mamita: We met at eight
Honore: I was on tim
e
Mamita: No, you were late
Honore: Ah, yes, I remember it well. We dined with friends
Mamita: We dined alone
Honore: A tenor sang
Mamita: A baritone
Honore: Ah, yes, I remember it well!

(“I Remember It Well,” from the musical Gigi, 1958)

“He said, she said.”  That’s what we call a dispute between two parties when the only evidence is one parties’ word against the other.  When there are two sides of a story, the judge must determine which party to believe: Which party is more credible?  Is there any other evidence which will corroborate a party’s story? Continue reading