Divorced with Kids: Tips for Back to School

Resolve to make each school year better than the last.

Resolve to make each school year better than the last.

It is that time of year again: teachers are decorating their classrooms, parents are shopping for school supplies, and students are enjoying the last few days of summer vacation.  The new school year is about to start.  What are you going to do to make this a great year?

Back-to-school season is even more stressful when your child shares two homes.  Your child’s education is tough enough already–meeting teachers, tracking homework, signing and filling out permission forms, keeping track of extracurricular activities–without having to deal with the extra chores involved in split custody.  Here are a few tips to get your child’s school year off to a good start–

1.  Keep a positive attitude. Your child may be reluctant for the summer to end and for the back-and-forth of regular visitation to resume.  When you keep a positive attitude, it makes it easier for your child to make the adjustment.  Your child will feed off of your emotions.  Don’t let them sense that you are uneasy about your ex-spouse’s visits.  Instead, help your child to look forward to spending time with their other parent.

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Grandparent Visitation

Most of the family law cases involving grandparents fit into one of two categories: grandparent visitation and grandparent custody. Grandparent visitation is when a grandparent seeks court-ordered visitation time with a grandchild. Grandparent custody is when grandparents seek physical custody of a grandchild; that is, when a grandparent seeks to become the primary person responsible for the physical safety and emotional welfare of the grandchild. Today’s post will deal with the subject of grandparent visitation. I will take up the issue of grandparent custody in the future. Continue reading

Advice for Parents in the Military

Thank you for your service!

Active military duty is hard on families.  Too often, marriages are a casualty of war.  When our servicemen are deployed for long periods of time, it is not uncommon for husbands and wives to grow apart.  Even when marriages survive, relationships with children can suffer.

If you and your spouse are having marital difficulties, and you anticipate separation or divorce, don’t forget the children.  Your efforts to maintain contact with your child during duty and deployment will directly affect the amount of parenting time you are granted when the divorce is final.  It could even determine whether the other parent is permitted to move out of state with your child.  Here are a few suggestions:

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C’mon Baby, Do the Locomotion: Locating and Relocating with a Child in a Colorado Divorce

A parent may decide where they wish to live upon divorce, but after divorce relocation is more complicated.

A parent may decide where they wish to live upon divorce, but after divorce relocation is more complicated.

Question 1: I am about to get a divorce, and I want to move back home to Texas. Will the court prevent me from moving with my child?
Answer: No. Colorado Law recognizes a parent’s right to decide where they wish to live upon divorce. Unlike some states, whose courts have the power to restrict the residence of a child (and thus a parent) to a particular county or geographic area, Colorado courts have decided that each parent has a constitutional right to live wherever they want.  If you want to move to Texas or any other place when the divorce is final, the court will not stop you.  What the court will do, however, is allocate parenting time between the parents based upon the best interests of the child.  In deciding how much parenting time each parent should have, the court will consider Continue reading

Welcome to my blog!

Kirk Garner has offices in Colorado Springs and Woodland Park.

Kirk Garner has offices in Colorado Springs and Woodland Park.

My name is Kirk Garner.  I am a lawyer with more than twenty years experience in a wide variety of family law matters, from divorce to child custody, child support to visitation, grandparents’ rights to adoption.  I practice law in Colorado Springs and Woodland Park.

I am writing this blog to provide general information to people who are considering or are already engaged in family law litigation in the State of Colorado.  I will address various topics related to family law cases; however, not everything will be directly related to litigation.  I will provide information to help parents guide their children through the difficult and painful process of separation, divorce, and visitation.

You should be aware that the advice and information provided in this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship.  Your comments are not covered by the attorney-client privilege.  If you are  seeking specific information about the law and facts of your particular case, you should contact an attorney in your area.

If you have a topic that you would like me to discuss, please let me know.  If you need further information, contact my office to set up a consultation.  I look forward to meeting you and assisting you and your family with all of your family law needs.